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How to Set Up a Router

A router gets its name from its function it routes your internet signal throughout your household computer network, directing it according to your needs. A router allows you to link all the computers in your home to the internet, usually to a printer, and sometimes to other peripherals or gaming systems. In computer jargon, the network you set up in your home is called a “local area network,” usually shown by the acronym LAN. The signal from your internet service provider is called a “wide-area network” (WAN). Your router establishes the critical connection between the WAN and the computers in your LAN.

If you have just moved into a new house and are establishing your internet connections and household network for the very first time, your telephone or cable service representative probably can do the installation for you, and it should cost you nothing. Most cable companies provide the modem you need and specify the brands and models of routers that are compatible with it.

If you are adding a router to an existing internet installation, your best resource for do-it-yourself hook-up of your router comes in the factory-sealed package with the router itself. The user’s manual and installation instructions detail exactly how to connect your router with your internet link and with your computers according to the unique requirements and specifications of your make and model. Just as importantly, the installation guide prominently displays the toll-free customer-service number that puts you directly in touch with your router’s manufacturer. Most experienced installers very strongly recommend you keep that number handy; right next to it, keep the customer service or technical assistance number for your internet service provider.

Here are the basic steps that you’d want to follow essentially in order to get the right thing done about your router set up.

• Verify the router’s current local IP address. The broadband routers which are typically used at home are manufactured and so programmed that they use a particular set of IP addresses. These addresses are: 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1, or 192.168.2.1.

• Ensure that your computer and router are indeed connected using an Ethernet or Wireless connection (Wi-Fi). Your computer’s IP address should sit in the same network as router, that way only you can access and configure it. In this case, the IP of the computer can be set in the range 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254.

• Now open a web browser window (IE or Firefox are the most commonly used web browsers) and use the local IP address to request connection to the router. This you can do by simply typing 192.168.1.1 in the address bar of the web browser in order to request a connection the router which has an IP address as 192.168.1.1.

• On successful completion of the browser’s request, the connection to the router would be established and you’d be prompted for the administrative username password for logging in. This information is necessary for you to be able to authenticate yourself. Usually the broadband routers contain this information as default set-ups and would be easily available if you have a look at your router’s documentation.

In case the browser request is rejected, an error message is displayed. This means that your computer is not yet connected to the router. To deal with such a situation, the most straightforward thing to do would be to reboot your router and then reset it to factory settings. Disabling the network firewall may also help. Try the steps 1 through 4 again.

Complete the installation with one computer and make sure it works with the internet; then, link other computers either by cable or wirelessly, adjusting your security settings as you add more PC’s to the network.

Contact Router Support Experts For Help
Contact Router Support Experts For Help

Article Source Link by Maria Hover